To gather information on how pupils feel about curricular activities which they undertake at schools

Aim

To gather information on how pupils feel about curricular activities which they undertake in school.

Evidence and reflection

One method, suitable for children or young people for whom writing is not difficult, is simply to ask them to write a comparison of two activities which you choose. It may be worth structuring this at the beginning by suggesting notes are made under headings such as the ones below:

 

Good things

Bad things

Activity 1

 

 

Activity 2

 

 

Activity 3

 

 

 

An alternative method would be to carry out a similar exercise verbally. There is no reason why even very young children cannot participate in discussions about the activities which they like and dislike. Fairly open questions might be used, such as, ‘Can you tell me about the things that you like doing best at school?’ and ‘Can you tell me about the things which you don’t like doing?’. These, if followed up sensitively by further enquiries to obtain reasons (and the results recorded), should soon show up the children’s criteria and patterns in their opinions about your provision. The recording is important, for when there is no record to reflect on it is very easy to fail to fully appreciate the messages one may be being offered.

Extension

This activity should yield data of considerable importance for future planning and provision, and should be analysed to identify any patterns in the children’s perspectives. If some children seem to be poorly motivated, to lack interest or to dispute the value of an activity, then the situation must be reconsidered and remedial measures taken.